Refactoring development

Ramblings from the trenches...

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Maybe ISO standardisation is a bit far, but as a programmer life is easier than as a musician. If I learn the flute but want to play the recorder I am forced to re-train my fingers in different movement patterns.

As a programmer, whether I’m coding in C++, C#, Java or JavaScript (and quite often in a combination of these) it’s inefficient to keep switching keybindings.

Find one standard set of keybinds that works for you and stick with it. This will mean you never need to ‘think’ about renaming a variable - you’ll just do it automatically.

For me, I’ve stick with Intellij keybindings for the last decade and it’s worked a treat.

Maybe it’s time for a github project to bring all the resources together to make it easy to keep to one set of bindings?

Eclipse:
IntelliJ:
Visual Studio:

Kaizen...

Now that we’ve got the right key bindings it’s important to get fluent with them:

Other ways to get fluent with the keystrokes:

Final thoughts...

So, by all means become a polyglot, but as you move onto the next language, take your keybindings with you.  
  Maybe ISO standardisation is a bit far, but as a programmer life is easier than as a musician. If I learn the flute but want to play the recorder I am forced to re-train my fingers in different movement patterns.

As a programmer, whether I’m coding in C++, C#, Java or JavaScript (and quite often in a combination of these) it’s inefficient to keep switching keybindings.

Find one standard set of keybinds that works for you and stick with it. This will mean you never need to ‘think’ about renaming a variable - you’ll just do it automatically.

For me, I’ve stick with Intellij keybindings for the last decade and it’s worked a treat.

Maybe it’s time for a github project to bring all the resources together to make it easy to keep to one set of bindings?

TODO: Talk about VI.